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The Oxfords

Oxford is a fabric originating from Scotland. During the 19th century, Scottish weavers experimented with new textile structures. One weaver developed four new fabrics and named them after the four universities Yale, Cambridge, Harvard and Oxford. 

The other fabrics' lifespan was short, but the Oxford fabric survived and became a popular fabric for shirts. Strictly speaking, Oxford is not a fabric but rather a weaving technique, but nowadays we just say Oxford. The fabric is somewhat heavier than other fabrics, and it has a rougher surface and texture. It is hardwearing, soft and flexible, it breathes well and wrinkles less than other fabrics. Traditionally, you weave Oxford with a white thread in the warp and with colour in the weft which gives the fabric a soft, austere and tonal effect. This is clear in Oscar Jacobson's Oxford shirts.

An Oxford shirt is appropriate to wear for most occassions. Initially, it was considered formal and was often combined with a tie. But when polo players started to wear it in the 19th century, it also acquired a sporty aura combined with luxury and flair. 


It was also horse polo that introduced the button-down collar, to avoid fluttering shirt collars.

During the 1930's, the Oxford shirt got picked up by the wealthy and intellectual elite at universities such as Yale, Princeton and Harvard. It became a symbol for Ivy League and the preppy look. 

Today, the shirt is available in many styles and price ranges. It has become a symbol for timeless class and is a natural part of a man's basic wardrobe. The same Oxford shirt that goes perfect with a tie and a blazer goes just as well with a pair of casual linen shorts in the Riviera. A finely woven Oxford shirt feels nicer and becomes softer the more you wash it. 

It can be nice to use a straighter, slightly looser fit with jeans or chinos, while a slimmer fit is more suitable under a blazer. If you want to go full on leisure, you can refrain from tucking your shirt in and leave the button-down buttons unbuttoned. 

Today, the shirt is available in many styles and price ranges. It has become a symbol for timeless class and is a natural part of a man's basic wardrobe. The same Oxford shirt that goes perfect with a tie and a blazer goes just as well with a pair of casual linen shorts in the Riviera. A finely woven Oxford shirt feels nicer and becomes softer the more you wash it.